Medial Tibial Stress Syndrome

by admin on April 3, 2012

Medial tibial stress syndrome is a common problem in the legs of runners. In the lay literature this is often called shin splints, which really just means ‘sore legs’. Medial tibial stress syndrome is thought to be due to stress on the bone or insertions of the muscles into the periosteum. There is some debate as to exactly what medial tibial stress syndrome actually is. It is not clear if it’s a bone stress reaction, on irritation of the periosteum or an insertional problem with the muscles. Classically the symptoms of medial tibial stress syndrome affect the middle part of the medial border of tibia. With most runners the symptoms of medial tibial stress syndrome are only present initially during running and do not cause any problems. Later they will interfere with the running. The treatment of medial tibial stress syndrome is to reduce activity levels to tolerance; look at the running form to see if changes to that will help; foot orthotics to correct any problems with the foot biomechanics. There then needs to be a slow and gradual return to full activity.

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